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Brethren are invited to send in material for display on this page - the only requirement is that it be of Masonic interest. Click on a picture to obtain a larger version.


 Click for bigger picture  (151k)

This plaque appears on the plinth of the Statue of Liberty, and relates to a time when working tools appear to have been more than symbolic. The wording on the plaque is as follows:
   ON THIS SITE ON AUGUST 5TH, 1884, THE CORNERSTONE OF THE PEDESTAL
   OF THE STATUE OF  "LIBERTY ENLIGHTENING THE WORLD"  WAS LAID WITH
   CEREMONY  BY  WILLIAM A. BRODIE,  GRAND MASTER OF MASONS  IN  THE
   STATE OF NEW YORK.   GRAND LODGE MEMBERS,  REPRESENTATIVES OF THE
   UNITED STATES  AND  FRENCH GOVERNMENTS,  ARMY AND NAVY  OFFICERS,
   MEMBERS OF FOREIGN LEGATIONS,  AND  DISTINGUISHED CITIZENS   WERE
   PRESENT.  THIS PLAQUE IS DEDICATED  BY  THE MASONS OF NEW YORK IN
   COMMEMORATION  OF  THE  100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THAT HISTORIC EVENT.

Beneath are the names of M.W. Calvin G. Bond, Grand Master of Masons, M.W. Arthur Markewice, Masonic Anniversary Chairman, and R.W. Robert C. Singer, Deputy Grand Master. The plaque is dated August 5th, 1984.

While the statue itself was the work of Frederic Bertholdi (a Freemason himself) the internal structure owes its design to one Gustave Eiffel (yet another Freemason), who is probably better known for his Parisian tour de force.

W.Bro. G. Meachen 09/07/09


The Broken Column Brooch


At a Ladies' Night dinner recently,
one of the ladies was seen to be
wearing this rather attractive
brooch. On asking about it, it
transpired that the wearer was a
member of the Surrey Masonic Widows
Association, which has adopted the
brooch as a badge of membership.




 The brooch was first used in the
 American Civil War, for the ladies
 of Masons who went to war. As so
 many did not return, and the ladies
 continued to wear the Brooch, it
 became accepted as a widow's
 brooch throughout North America and
 Canada. Its use was first introduced
 into England by a member of the Earl
 of Chester Lodge No. 1565, and is
 having wide acceptance throughout
 the United Kingdom.


W.Bro. G. Meachen 16/03/15
Top of page

This picture was taken from a passing
car while in Cape Cod, Massachusetts.
Intrigued by the connection between
sportswear and Masonry, it was
investigated further on foot. The Temple
is located above the shop, with access
via a tiny porchway or entrance on the
south side.
 Click for bigger picture  (169k)
 Click for bigger picture  (124k)

Within the porch is this sign, showing
that the Lodge has a charter signed by
a rather well-known figure in those
parts - M.W. Paul Revere.

Presumably he rode to meetings . . .


W.Bro. G. Meachen 21/10/00Top of page

Apocrypha

Recently I was given a small ritual book entitled "The Irish Workings of Craft Masonry", reputed to have belonged to my grandfather. In it was a folded, yellowing page cut from an autobiography of some one regrettably unknown, with the following paragraphs marked:

'A third story connected with Doneraile: it is famous for an event which I believe is unique in the history of Freemasonry. It was at this old Irish house that the only woman Mason was initiated. The Lord Doneraile of the time, a Mason of high standing, had converted his gunroom into a Masonic Temple. There was only one exit from this room into the main hall of the house, and the only other means of entering or leaving was by way of a small staircase which led up to a chamber in which certain articles were stored. This chamber had no other exit, which meant that anyone in the small room could not get back into the main portion of the house without passing through the gunroom.
Lady Doneraile had gone through the gunroom into the small chamber some time before the Masons began their meeting. She had either dozed, or her mission had taken longer than she expected, but when she began to leave she found her way blocked by the meeting. She also discovered that she could hear every word that was being spoken.
Eventually she gave away her position and it was decided by the perturbed Masons that she must take an oath of secrecy and also conform to the laws of Masonry.'

I would be very interested if anyone can throw any light on this (presumably apocryphal) anecdote. Very little information is contained about the author on the single page, but it appears that his grandfather, one General George Selby, owned a house called 'Velmead' which stood (or may even still stand, though in these days of infill building this appears unlikely) somewhere in the Crookham area.


Addendum #1 - many thanks to C. Castellini for this URL relating to the clipping: http://www.iol.ie/~nodonnel/doncourt.htm
Addendum #2 - many thanks in turn to W. Bro. David Else who recently took a party
of  Mark Masons  to  Ireland,  where they visited  St. Fin Barres Cathedral,  and there 
discovered the resting place of Elizabeth Aldworth, the lady in question.

W. Bro David has also kindly supplied this  photograph  of the lady's memorial plaque,
which gives us the Lodge involved  -  Donoughmore Lodge, Clonmel, No. 44 in the province
of Waterford.
That in itself  provides some interest,  as  Doleraine Court  stands in northern Cork, over
an hour's drive from  Waterford  even today, and  much  longer  in the eighteenth century.
The  Court is likely to be converted into a  "tourist Mecca" soon; Donoughmore Lodge
currently meets in Clonmel. Why did they meet in Doleraine on that fateful day in 1712,
one wonders?

From the same source comes this URL relating to the Honourable Elizabeth herself:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Aldworth 


If you'd like to read W.Bro David's report on his Irish visit, please click here.







W.Bro. G. Meachen 13/11/15Top of page